philanthropy

Just in time for Passover what are the 10 plagues of Philanthropy?

Passover, the Jewish holiday welcoming in the spring, remembering the freedom from slavery in Egypt and reflecting on the role that individuals and families play in society is also the holiday of asking questions. Children are encouraged to think critically of the story of Exodus, adults come prepared with topics for discussion of current events as it pertains to culture, ethics, politics and humanity and debates become an “around the table” all night affair. So I thought it fitting that we question the relationship between the 10 Plagues that God brought down on Pharaoh at the behest of Moses to create an escape route for the Israelites and how those plagues can be reflected in today’s philanthropic climate.

Every year we post a list of some of the organizations that Place2Give Foundation Canada and US Donors and Karma & Cents clients have supported during the year.  Here is the list of this year's organizations, all of which can be found and supported through Place2Give.

Calgary, Alberta - At Place2Give we strive to connect the power of consumer behaviour with the act of giving.  Every year of the billions of dollars are spent of the holiday gifts purchased in in North America, over $100Billion will be spent in the form of a Gift Card.  In fact, according to Gift Card Granny, 93% of people have either bought or gifted a card.  We want to encourage people to continue to purchase gift cards AND make charitable contributions at the same time.  TheCardThatGives is just that type of giving vehicle.  You buy a gift card, give it to a friend and they redirect the face value to any one of Canada’s 90,000 charities.  

Charitable organizations are familiar with logic models as they are a generally accepted method of reporting on what a project will be doing and what it intends to accomplish as a result of those activities.  In some cases, th

Last week I was interviewed on Alberta PrimetIme about the changing face of philanthropy and small business.

You can see the video here.

In previous posts I have talked about looking at your charitable giving from the perspective of a portfolio. A diversified a number of organizations within a “narrow giving theme” (i.e. access to water) allows you to see the impact of your donations through quantitative and qualitative analysis, with limited or no cross-pollination of information between the agencies.  It also allows you to compare your funding results with other funders for donation performance (similar to how one would compare mutual funds).

Today is #GivingTuesday and charities are out in full-force, cap-in-hand. Place2Give has been a part of GivingTuesday for the past number of years.  In fact, one year we lead a Calgary-based initiative along with 10 other organizations including AFP Calgary.  I quickly became challenged with this model of fundraising, not because I don’t believe that charities should fundraise, but because this time of year people, while they are thinking of giving, are really focused on buying. 

So why not tap into that mindset? 

This week are celebrating National Philanthropy Week across North America.  It is a time to reflect and celebrate those who have positively impacted our communities and is the lead-up to #GivingTuesday events around the world.

As such, I thought it worthwhile sharing some thoughts on a recent event hosted by Imagine Canada on the future state of the Social Sector.  I attended the one in Calgary. It was a panel discussion moderated by Allan Northcott (Max Bell Foundation) and the panelists included Sharon McIntyer (Chaordix), Tracey Vavrek (Community Foundation of Northwest Alberta) and Dan Overall (Trico Foundation).

There were some common thoughts shared across the panel and a few other observations that came from the discussion following the panelists’ remarks. Please note, I have paraphrased the questions and answers.

Guest Blogger: Josh Swallow is an undergrad student at Texas A&M. He is currently in his final year and exploring opportunities in the non-profit sector for his career.  This summer he spent time working at Dexterity, meeting with charities, donors and social entrpereneurs.

I think it is safe to say that technology has had a huge part in my life since the day that I was born. So many aspects of my life have been made “easier” because of it. For example, paying my bills at university is one of the simplest things in the world now (aside from having to let go of them sweet, sweet, dollar bills y’all) that takes a few minutes of my time whereas it used to be somewhat of an ordeal. This is a simple example but the same concept can be applied to charitable giving. So how has technology affected the charitable sector?

Guest Blogger – Josh Swallow: Josh is a summer intern and attends Texas A&M University where he is studying Business Management with a Certificate in Not-for-Profit Business. “I have always wanted to help people but never knew exactly where that would take me in life. When I started to learn more about the multitude of nonprofits around the world and how much good they were doing I knew that was the industry that I wanted to end up in!”

Nonprofit organizations in the U.S. are in a very interesting position when it comes to taxation. If the qualifications are met, an organization can gain tax-exempt status which allows said organization to be exempt from paying some federal income taxes. While this is a fantastic concept that is absolutely helpful to the nonprofits that it applies to, I can’t help but feel that the qualifications for gaining this status may be too lenient. Thus, in this post I am going to talk about some of the baffling organizations who have gained and reatined this status and why I find this is troubling.