philanthropy

We have tasked the charitable sector with the mandate to solve complex problems.  Social problems like poverty; health problems like childhood obesity; future problems such as educating the next generation.  As funders we then fall into the trap of requiring large reporting mechanisms and "proof."  These processes draw down on resources and are sometimes in conflict with what our perception of the value of spending funds on the overhead required to meet these reporting requirements.

In the April 18th, 2015 edition of The Economist the opening editorial about leadership ended with the statement, “Family power, like any other sort, needs watching over.  If it cannot be contested, it should not be welcome.”

Philanthropy in the family enterprise model is distinct from other family based charitable giving programs.  What makes philanthropy planning for family-owned businesses and their successors is the relationships that the enterprise has with the family.  Over the next three weeks I will be sharing a series of posts about philanthropy in the family enterprise model, leading up to the Michael Shuman, Social Impact Investing summit that is being held in Calgary on April 18 and 19 as part of the REAP Calgary Down to Earth Week.

80% of Canada’s economy is built on small and medium sized businesses.  It is estimated that 90% of those are family owned.  What comes to mind when I say family business might be some of the larger names like McCain, Ford Automotive, Loblaws (Weston Family), Sobey’s, Wal-Mart, Cargill, and Shaw; but there are a number, lesser known or more localized family businesses that cover every possible industry in our country from automotive to agriculture, from retail to construction, from IT to the energy sector.  With such large market-share in our economy it’s a wonder that we don’t hear about the strength and values that family businesses bring to our economy, especially when things are turning downwards.

Every year I provide a list of organizations that Dexterity Consulting clients and Place2Give donors have directed their funds.  This past year we have seen significant growth in our donor base and so the list below is a snapshot of the organizations that were supported.  

As this is your last chance for year-end donations, we have made giving easy - by clicking on any one of the links you can donate directly to the charity through the Place2Give Foundation.

Happy New Year and thank you for your generosity and continued support of the organizations that make our communities strong!

Every year I provide a list of organizations that Dexterity Consulting clients and Place2Give donors have directed their funds.  This past year we have seen significant growth in our donor base and so the list below is a snapshot of the organizations that were supported.  

As this is your last chance for year-end donations, we have made giving easy - by clicking on any one of the links you can donate directly to the charity through the Place2Give Foundation.

Happy New Year and thank you for your generosity and continued support of the organizations that make our communities strong!

This week I had the privilege of attending the Nexus Youth Summit in Washington, DC.  The purpose of this summit is to bring together leaders in philanthropy, social enterprise, social finance and the Next Generation for a series of conversations that lead to action around the critical issues facing our communities - locally, nationally, internationally.

One session that stood out in particular for me was a session on Climate and Philanthropy.  A panel discussion with:

As you can see, this panel cross the spectrum of Republicans and Democrats with a view to find economic solutions and market-based solutions to environmental problems.  

In today's Seth Godin blog - Babies and Bath Water, he lists the organizations that he is supporting for GivingTuesday and also links to the "worst" charities.  

What makes a worst charity? 

 

November 20th, 2014 - Presentation at CKX (Community Knowledge Exchange) on how data is influencing individual and family philanthropy as well as the role that advisors and estate planners are having on the discussion.  

Over the past five years I have been writing about strategic giving and social impact investing.  Since starting this blog, Generating Social Capital, and working with clients on the Karma & Cents™ philanthropy planning process the landscape has changed and as a result so too has my approach to strategic philanthropy.  

As we enter into the holiday season, as is typical, we will all be approached to donate.  Some of us will look at this as opportunity to give as part of our tax planning process, others will be looking at the holiday giving season with more of a philanthropic approach.  Either way, giving should be done with mindfulness.

Enter GivingTuesday. A national movement that is leading the charge on counter-balancing Black Friday and Cyber Monday.  Please read on, to learn more about how we are encouraging people to use the GivingTuesday movement for strategic philanthropy.