philanthropy

There are several things we can learn from past natural disasters and the way that donations were handled:

Once again we are facing an international humanitarian crisis - an earthquake in Japan that has tsunami ripple effects across the world.

Guest blogger - Karine Aviv

Last week I had the pleasure of volunteering in my daughter's grade 5 class at Nellie McClung Elementary School in Calgary, for a fundraiser for the Conquer Cancer Foundation.  It was very touching to see all the kids in her classroom so excited about the event, and to see the rest of the school participate.

In honour of International Women's Day this post is about women and philanthropy.  Part of this post comes from a presentation I made at the Insight Series for the Canadian Women's Foundation a few weeks ago.

In a recent Tactical Philanthropy blog post, Sean Stannard-Stockton highlights four approaches to philanthropy:

Guest blogger – Karine Aviv

Ever since I started working in this sector, I’ve been hearing a lot about fraud.  This is a great concern, because as someone who donates money to charities, I want to know that it is being put to good use, and not going into someone’s personal pocket.  So, what is really going on?

In response to the Globe & Mail article published yesterday, "Charities see alarming trends as donors become older, fewer" I think this Paul Waldie is crying fire in a crowded theatre. 

In response to the Globe & Mail article published yesterday, "Charities see alarming trends as donors become older, fewer" I think this Paul Waldie is crying fire in a crowded theatre. 

The past few weeks has seen momentous change in North America's political spectrum.  From municipal elections across Canada (see Rob Ford in Toronto and Naheed Nenshi in Calgary) to the rise of the Tea Party movement in the United States.  Citizens are using their votes to voice their opinions. This leads to the question, how much time should pass before we, as a society should expect change?